This blogpost is mainly for those new to these music genres, but the veterans might enjoy the documentaries included on this page. A BBC documentary from 1994, one on LTJ Bukem, Goldie etc.

I mainly have experience and knowledge within the Drum ‘n Bass scene, the 1990’s is what is closest to my heart, and especially the so-called “Liquid” stuff without vocals is what gets me.

Rude boy, rudeboy, rudie, rudi, and rudy are slang terms that originated in 1960s Jamaican street culture, and that are still used today. In the late 1970s, there was a revival in England of the terms rude boy and rude girl, among other variations, being used to describe fans of two-tone ska. The use of these terms moved into the more contemporary ska punk movement as well. […]

I have no idea why I call this style of 1990’s techno “British Hooligan Techno”. But all I see infront of me is white British Adidas wearing working class guys on ecstasy dancing in big green fields. But the album I mainly associate this group with, Interspecies Communication is more of a spiritual journey that much like their 1998 movie takes you on a journey around the globe to people who doesn’t live like we in the west do.

8/10 … I don’t know what I should think about these fucking low-life idiots. They feels like the definition of uneducated white trash, but in nicer living areas than trailers. The stupidity of these morons knows no bounderies. At the same time, I get why you want to take revenge on a bully. I gives an extra grade of “goodness” that it’s based on a true story.

9/10 … In 1968, Sly & The Family Stone appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show performing the exuberant but little-known album track “Love City.” The following year, they returned to the show for what proved to be a legendary performance, playing an excerpt from their #1 hit “Everyday People” before launching into the iconic “Dance To The Music.” In both episodes, the home viewer was presented with a high energy performance by a band fully engaged with both the audience and themselves. On Sullivan, the band was facing each other just as often as they were facing the cameras. At the center of the action was Sly Stone who, when not playing the organ, was breaking into explosive dance routines on stage, and at one point running into the audience with his bandmate and sister Rose. Clearly this was a band determined to not only win over their audience, but truly own them from beginning until end.

9/10 … In 1968, Sly & The Family Stone appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show performing the exuberant but little-known album track “Love City.” The following year, they returned to the show for what proved to be a legendary performance, playing an excerpt from their #1 hit “Everyday People” before launching into the iconic “Dance To The Music.” In both episodes, the home viewer was presented with a high energy performance by a band fully engaged with both the audience and themselves. On Sullivan, the band was facing each other just as often as they were facing the cameras. At the center of the action was Sly Stone who, when not playing the organ, was breaking into explosive dance routines on stage, and at one point running into the audience with his bandmate and sister Rose. Clearly this was a band determined to not only win over their audience, but truly own them from beginning until end.

There’s a lot of actors I really like, but for some reason Philip Seymour Hoffman stod out from the others to me. I think it was his troubled countenance, a kind of sorrow and pain that hanged over him that spoke to me, that set him apart from others and made me kind of identify with him. Maybe this sounds presumptuous, since I didn’t know him, so of course I didn’t know how he felt. That’s why I think the interview further down this page about happiness is really great and interesting…