Of Science And Religion

Einstein: “The word God is for me nothing more than the expression and product of human weaknesses, the Bible a collection of honourable, but still primitive, legends which are nevertheless pretty childish.”

Nikola Tesla: ”There is no conflict between the ideal of religion and the ideal of science, but science is opposed to theological dogmas because science is founded on fact.”

Hawking: “Spontaneous creation is the reason there is something rather than nothing, why the universe exists, why we exist…It is not necessary to invoke God to light the blue touch paper and set the universe going.”

Curie: “Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.”

Rosalind Franklin: “Anyone able to believe in all that religion implies obviously must have such faith, but I maintain that faith in this world is perfectly possible without faith in another world…I see no reason to believe that a creator of protoplasm or primeval matter, if such there be, has any reason to be interested in our insignificant race in a tiny corner of the universe, and still less in us, as still more insignificant individuals.”

Ramakrishnan: “A culture based on superstitions will do worse than one based on scientific knowledge and rational thoughts.”

“[Niels] Bohr‘s sort of humor, use of parables and stories, tolerance, dependence on family, feelings of indebtedness, obligation, and guilt, and his sense of responsibility for science, community, and, ultimately, humankind in general, are common traits of the Jewish intellectual. So too is a well-fortified atheism. Bohr ended with no religious belief and a dislike of all religions that claimed to base their teachings on revelations.”
Finn Aaserud, Love, Literature, and the Quantum Atom: Niels Bohr’s 1913 Trilogy Revisited

“Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt.” ― Richard P. Feynman.

Jane Goodall: “I don’t have any idea of who or what God is.”